Direct Article Marketing And How To Estimate Your Target Audience

When you write an article with a goal to reach your target readers, there is a number of important factors you need to pay attention to if you want to succeed. The most important factor is to know your readership and speak in their language. When you address your prospects, do it in a manner that will hit home, which they will easily relate to and therefore be receptive to the messages you are conveying to them through your writing. Messages and advices that are given in a direct manner will fall to much more fertile ground – your readership will understand, consider and accept them better. The best way to have your point get across is to have your audience get the sense that they are being directly addressed to in your articles.

The power of written word has little limits. It is a perfect way to reach and connect with your readers, once you understand who they are. You will strengthen that connection by constant working on your credibility and trust as an article author. And credibility and trust are the only two ingredients that will keep your readers coming back to you for more reading, influencing them to appreciate and accept your message. Before you even start writing you need to estimate the knowledge level of your target readers. The amount of details and expert terminology you provide in your articles will directly depend on that estimation and will make your articles tailor-made for that specific audience. If you include more advanced information and details, average readers will have harder time understanding your articles, but the expert in the field, on the other hand, will find your content very valuable and will appreciate the content that is not written for average readership.

If you decide to appease the general audience, the experts will find little or no use in your writing, but average readers will better understand and appreciate your style of writing. Anyhow, it is important to estimate the knowledge level of the readership for whom you are writing and tailor terminology and details included in your articles accordingly. If you are writing for a field where the knowledge level of your audience is diversified, it would be wise if you wrote the content separately for as many level as it takes. You will want to reach all of them, so in order to make it happen, it is important to make each of those readership levels feel like they are being directly addressed. This approach will immensely boost the impact of your article marketing, so invest some time to perform a careful analysis of your target readers.

How to Mix Your Sales and Marketing Efforts – And Why You Should

A traditional sales campaign typically involves a sales force following up on new leads from website inquiries, calls for more information, purchased lead lists, and referrals. Your sales force (or perhaps that is you) makes calls on potential new customers, completes the “dog and pony show” and then continues to follow up in order to convert that lead into a sale. Usually, this effort is easily measurable. You either see results or you don’t. The process is black and white.

In marketing, measurable goals can appear a bit grayer. But they don’t have to be. Each and every time you implement a new marketing strategy, you must affirm that it is indeed measurable. Otherwise, how else will you know if your time and money was well spent? Ultimately, the key here is to actually blend your sales and marketing efforts together for maximum return on investment. When you tie these two together, measuring the end result actually becomes that much easier.

Measuring marketing efforts can be a scary thought. Just as sales people have quotas, the marketing crew needs a measure of accountability, because every dollar that you spend on creating awareness (and ultimately sales) for your business should deliver a return on that investment. Sometimes marketers get tagged as an expenditure because they’re known for spending, spending, spending. In truth, your marketers are responsible for generating the leads that are handed over to the closers.

There are ways to change this misconception. The first step is to create sales and marketing programs and initiatives that complement each other. Let’s take a look at a few ways of doing this and how you can make this work for you:

1. Brand recognition – Marketers are continually developing a brand or identity for a business, and while this may not result in direct sales, these ongoing efforts are critical in producing sales over the long haul. Consistent, strong branding messages create an image that is top of mind for your customers, so when it does come time for them to buy, they think of you and not your competitor. If you were to ignore your brand and not create a solid identity, your sales would suffer in the long run.

2. Measuring brand activity – While it’s important to create and maintain solid brand identity, in today’s economic climate, that simply isn’t enough. You must create a way to effectively measure the impact of your brand. With the emergence of online marketing and advertising, we can now actually measure this type of branding more easily. You can now add call tracking or click tracking to your online advertising campaigns and gauge to what degree your efforts are making an impact and which ones are falling flat. Don’t just assume that your brand is being recognized. Use it in ways that can measured and calculated with an ROI.

3. Marketing is the lead generation arm of sales – As mentioned earlier, the sales force typically follows up on leads, regardless of how they are generated. But how are they generated? Some may be purchased while others may result from referrals. Still, a good portion of them typically come from your advertising, PR, direct mail, and website activity that falls into a business’ marketing mix. One way to measure these efforts is to create tracking codes, distinct links, or personalized URLs (PURLs) for each marketing piece in order to quantify how many leads a particular campaign may generate. Add language to a direct mail piece like, “Mention this postcard to receive a free widget.” Or create a promotional code that is when a customer requests more information from your inquiry form on your website. These tactics will allow you to actually determine where your leads are coming from.

Marketing and sales are not separate and distinct functions. They must work in synch to be effective and powerful. You may have to get a bit more creative in how you measure ROI, but it is possible to gauge your marketing efforts just as easily as it is to be accountable for your sales tactics. If you continue to look at sales and marketing as a package instead of individual entities, your overall efforts will be easier to measure as well.

A Brief Guide to Everything Whisk(e)y

There are countless brands on the market today but there’s also “craft” spirits which use locally sourced ingredients and only distil in small batches so as to ensure quality control. This new trend is in the form of artisan spirits made by craft distillers such as The Lakes Whisky. Craft whiskies can be found in most countries across the world including Scotland, Ireland, USA & Canada among others.

What is whisky made of

Whisky is made using a few different ingredients:

Barley (most common).
Wheat, Corn and Soybeans (USA/Canada uses these to substitute barley which is costly).
Potatoes & Sugar Beet (For Vodka in Russia/Poland).
Water and yeast for fermentation.

It is then distilled before aging it in oak barrels until ready to be bottled.

Whisky may also add flavours such as cinnamon or honey after the distillation process stops or use other forms of alcohol besides beer or wine during fermentation like brandy or cognac. This all depends on what flavour profile they’re trying to achieve with their product. Some whiskies are made using a continuous still while others will use pot stills such as those distilled in Scotland.

Craft Whisky is defined as whisky that has been distilled in a pot still, made from grain and aged for at least three years in oak barrels of less than 700 L capacity. It must also be bottled at no more than 80 proof (40% ABV) so it doesn’t become diluted with water during filtration or have any added colouring, flavours or other spirits mixed into it before being bottled. This makes craft whisky unique because each distillery will create their own flavour profile using different types of grains, yeast strains & techniques to give you an individual product every time.

The history of whiskey

Whisky was first introduced into the world in 1405 by the Scottish. The use of copper pot stills, where grains are fermented then distilled, differed from other regions that used larger copper vessels for distillation and ageing resulting in a more delicate product. These smaller stills were often heated over an open fire which brought out subtle flavours & aromas not found using other methods or materials.

Whisky can be made anywhere around the globe but must follow strict guidelines before being called whisky, otherwise it’s just ethyl alcohol with added flavourings. Creativity has blossomed following this new wave of craft whisky which uses unique ingredients and methods in order to bring out the best flavours and aromas possible. This can range from using specific types of wood for casks to adding small amounts of sherry or port wines.

How to enjoy your favourite whisk(e)y drink

Whisky should be consumed according to your personal preferences. Here are some suggestions on how you can enjoy your favourite whisky drink:

Add ice cubes or water for a more refreshing version of the same whisky type.
Use ginger ale, cola or mix with fruit juice in order to get an interesting cocktail variety.
Whisky stones are perfect if you want to keep your whisky cool without watering it down. Just pop them in the freezer beforehand and they will be ready when needed.

Whisky cocktails

Whisky is also the ideal spirit to use in cocktails such as the Manhattan, the Old Fashioned and of course, Irish Coffee.

Here are some amazing whisky cocktails:

The classic Whisky Sour.
Delicious Whisky Punch.
Spiced Berries & Honey Cocktail.

There is no end to your creativity where whisky is concerned. If you enjoy creating delicious drinks at home then there will be plenty more ideas. You can even try infusing your own spirits or liqueurs with different flavours such as vanilla, cinnamon or coffee to name just a few possibilities. Experimenting will open up an entire world of new flavour profiles which you can use in all sorts of wonderful ways to entertain your friends and family.

Types of whiskies and their characteristics

The different types of whiskeys include the following:

Bourbon whiskey is the most popular type of American whisky which has its origins in Kentucky, USA. It must be made with at least 51% corn and often contains other grains such as barley or malt. The characteristic flavour comes from the aging process which takes place in charred white oak barrels for at least two years before it can be sold to customers.
Craft whisky refers to any spirit that meets certain requirements regarding how it was produced, this includes being created by a small distillery without large quantities of mass production techniques or artificial additives used during fermentation or bottling.
Scotch whisky (made in Scotland) is one of the most popular and sought-after types of whisky in the world. It has a long history and is very much in demand.
American whiskies are not as famous, but they have been growing in popularity. They include bourbons and Tennessee whiskeys that can be produced anywhere within the US; there is no restriction on geography or water source unlike Scotch whisky.
Irish whisky is a much more unique flavoured whisky because of the way it is distilled. It uses a pot still distillation process that creates the distinctive rich, smooth and sweet taste of Irish whisky.
Single malt whisky is made from a mash of only malted barley. It must also be made on the same site as where it is aged, which separates it from ‘blended malt whisky.
Single grain whisky is a subtype of American whisky and distilled at one particular distillery.
Corn Whisky or ‘White Dog’ is unaged whisky that has been distilled out of at least 80% maize mash. It can also contain other grains including wheat, barley and rye but not malted barley.
Blended Whisky consists of both malt and grain whiskies blended together by the master blender before bottling to create an end product with different characteristics.